If You Aren’t Already Using a VPN, Time to Start

I mean, everybody wants to make sure their ISPs can sell their data, right?

I was particularly saddened to see Rep. Massie on the list of those voting for this measure. Having worked for him (years ago), he is certainly smart enough to understand the technical implications here, but voted out of the idea that the free market was already doing a good enough job of this (i.e. Comcast won’t sell your data without your permission, for fear that you’ll leave for a competitor).

The problem is that, in great portions of this country, there’s no free market for ISPs. In most locations, it’s a local monopoly. I’m lucky: in my city, we have two cable providers, plus high speed fiber (fios). In the town I grew up in? One cable provider. And then DSL, if you live in the right spot. The house I grew up in? No DSL. No options.

Anyway, use a VPN. Most sites are using HTTPS these days, which is helpful, but your ISP will still know what name you looked up, what IP came back, and how long you were on the site. If you want to be careful, switch to an open DNS provider, and use a VPN. Most DNS providers will also use your data, but they will at least give you the option to opt-out. (As backwards as this sounds, I’d recommend Google Public DNS).[1]

For VPN, both Cloak and TunnelBear are reasonably cheap (probably less than you pay for 1 month of internet) and easy. Or, if you’re so inclined, roll your own.


  1. Google’s DNS privacy is pretty clear—“We don’t correlate or combine information from our temporary or permanent logs with any personal information that you have provided Google for other services.”  ↩

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